The Politics Police

This article, which I wrote, was first published by Spiked. The people may elect representatives, so long as their representatives are well behaved. That appears to be the message of the disciplinary hearing against Greater London Authority (GLA) member and British National Party representative, Richard Barnbrook, which was due to take place last week. In […]

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Nationalisation – The Elephant in the Studio

Last night’s Newsnight had an excellent report on the occupation at Vestas, complete with an interview with one of the workers and coverage of a demonstration . It correctly highlighted the exciting, though not nearly as unprecedented as the report suggests, alliance of organised workers and green groups. However, the interview afterwards was an exercise […]

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Jerusalem for 2010

If, like me, you are a  football fan then you will already be getting vague itchings of world cup fever. Yet, as things draw nearer another feeling may come over you. It will be a feeling of dread for the ridiculous spectacle with which England begins every match. At the world cup, every national anthem has the […]

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Food for Thought

This article, which I co-authored with environmental lawyers Ambika Hiranandani and Roland Miller McCall, was first published in The Times of India What do George Bernard Shaw, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Leo Tolstoy, Leonardo Da Vinci, Paul McCartney, and Pythagoras have in common? If your answer is they’re all towering figures of European culture, you’re only […]

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The Ban on Bigamy is Inconsistent and Illiberal

Those of you who lead busier lives than I do (which at the moment is probably most of you) might have missed this news story which came out recently: Emily Horne, who suffers from bipolar disorder, was yesterday given a 10-month suspended sentence for “serial bigamy”. Lisa Baker-Conway, the sister of her fifth husband, was […]

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Review: The Age of Stupid

It’s extremely easy to criticise the politics of cultural products if you don’t agree with absolutely everything they say. If you consider your understanding to be more nuanced, it is very easy to say that a book, a film, or an article doesn’t go far enough. The point is that not every great film is […]

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‘A Weak Weekly Look at the Week’ – America

Apologies, as last week’s post was so weak it lacked the strength to even haul itself up onto a webpage. But it’s back! A Weak Weekly Look at the Weak – but this week, we’re scrappin’ the history and just goin for some downright political and (hopefully) previously unseen stories in the faint hope of stimulating some debate on the comment board. Have at it – it’s America.

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Some Thoughts on Chester Himes on the 100th Anniversary of His Birth

Guest post by Tadzio Koelb This week Chester Himes would have celebrated his 100th birthday. If this event is remembered at all, it will mostly be by those who are interested in Himes as the “black Raymond Chandler”, pulp master of the Harlem Renaissance. While this is an accurate reflection of how Himes is read, […]

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Is Demographics Intrinsically a Right-Wing Discipline?

Guest post by Kamaljeet Gill I recently attended a book launch for a work called The Power of Numbers, why Europe needs to have more Children by Richard Ehrman. The event was organised by Policy Connect, a think tank that positions itself as somewhat the progressive edge of the Conservative Party (meaningless as that phrase […]

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How much should we remember?

How much should we memorialise tragic events? Poland is home to many of the landmarks of horror associated with the Nazis. But of these arguably the two most notorious are memorialised in very different ways. Auschwitz-Birkenau is the concentration and extermination camps where over a million Jews, gypsies, communists, trade unionists and lesbians and gays […]

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