In praise of Gareth ‘Alfie’ Thomas by a Welsh communist and rugby lover

This post was written by Guest Post on December 24, 2009
Posted Under: Uncategorized

This is a guest post by Ben Lewis.

gareththomasIt is rare in the news that you read or see something that cheers you up. The far left press’s eternal Panglossianism – occasionally tantamount to self-delusion – does not count in this respect. Overwhelmingly, it serves to maintain a pseudo-reality in which the bosses are really bad (and things are getting worse for them), and we, the left (ie this or that particular sectlet) are progressing inexorably towards socialism. Shades of Stalin’s five year plans and Brezhnev’s ‘we will be at communism by year X’, maybe?

So it was that, being both a huge rugby fan and somebody who has consistently agitated for LGBT rights all of his adult life, there was a story that did cheer me up last weekend – Gareth ‘Alfie’ Thomas coming out. Despite being a harrowing tale of a man coming to terms with himself and the world around him, it is one that fills me with great optimism and hope. He is the first openly gay professional rugby player and – as an ex-captain of Wales with over 100 Welsh caps, loads of points and even some appearances as captain for the British & Irish Lions in New Zealand – probably the most high-profile sportsman to come out.

The Wales on Sunday (think News of the World but with fairly decent rugby reporting) stated that his homosexuality is “one of the worst kept secrets in the game”. This is certainly true.

It must have been about ten years ago that I first got wind of rumours of Alfie’s homosexuality. And it was on the pitch. A huge Cardiff fan, I was in the stands with a cheap £1 ticket (them were the days!) for a home game against Ebbw Vale. I was quite shocked by some of the fans’ reaction: “You can’t play rugby, you’re a fucking queer”. It was Alfie who had the last laugh though, scoring no less than five tries (!) against a distraught Ebbw back line that could neither deal with his pace, twinkle-toes step or his sheer physicality. Good on you, Alfie.

Rugby is a much maligned and misunderstood sport often dismissed as the preserve of brutish, air-headed public school boys engaged in an 80 minute futile war of attrition. I often despair at such an ignorant conception of the game, comparing people who spout such nonsense to the way that the political establishment, academia and ‘Marxologists’ alike malign Marxism – purporting to disprove its fundamental tenets without even having bothered to read any of the stuff. One ‘authoritative’ work I read stated in its introduction that the problem with Marx was that he saw all property as theft! Are you taking the piss from the grave, Mr.Proudhon? How does this stuff even get published?

Anyway, there is method in my invective. In many ways, ‘Alfie’ does sum up the multi-faceted and complex beauty of the game of rugby, and why it is more than the standard “big blokes running into each other”.
He combines 15 stones of brute strength with a sprinting ability not far behind some of the best athletes. Running full tilt, he can turn on his feet quickly enough to find the smallest of gaps in the 50-stone-thick wall of the opposition back row, he can put a ball carrier into the air and then proceed to rip the ball from his clutches, and he can pass and kick with a subtlety that many basketball players and footballers would be proud of. As somebody who has followed Cardiff Blues and the Welsh XV since he was able to mouth the word ‘rugby’, Alfie has always been a personal hero of mine. He knew that to succeed and fully reach the awesome potential of his talents he had to live a lie.

Merely in order to survive, most of us live some sort of existence where we have to lie not only to others but – perhaps more importantly – to ourselves. ‘Being successful’ or, the term I loathe most, ‘bettering yourself’ at the very least means telling some fibs to somebody sometimes, and usually a whole lot worse… ‘Life choice’ – the watchword of liberals – almost invariably means eking out an existence in some unfulfilling job at the expense of pursuing manifold interests and developing our talents. We are trapped in the realm of necessity, where our private sphere of activity precludesour development into well-rounded human beings who are at once critics, sheperds, hunters and fishermen. As such it is hardly surprising that both the playing and watching of sport become mere forms of escapism, a means of ‘getting away from life’, rather than actually feeding into this social development. Particularly in rugby with its ‘macho’ image, this means that bigotry and intolerance are easily replicated at all levels of the game. In this instance, it is a narrow, partriarchal, understanding of gender and sexuality that has been exposed. For some, after all, it is anathema that a man who is sexually attracted to other men could be a strong, physically fit and successful rugby player, just as a ‘real man’ (ie a heterosexual one supping Strongbow whilst perusing page 3) could ever be, say, a successful dancer or fashion designer. As somebody who has played rugby from the age of 4, the Alfie case pertinently brings home how – for all the claims about gay equality – there is still a long way to go in a struggle that is intricately bound up with far more wide-ranging social change than formal equality and the hijacking of LGBT rights via the ‘pink pound’ and so on.

Had Alfie planned all of this in order to bring these questions out? Or are more sinister forces of blackmail (ie The Daily Mail) at work? Back in the heady days of him captaining Wales to Grand Slam success, for example, he had to leave the Welsh camp in order to persuade a newspaper from printing something about him.

This direct correlation between his rugby success and the media interest in his private life underlines the tragedy of all this. The media will sink to almost any depths in order to make money – often ringing up celebrities and sports stars to inform them that they have certain pictures of them with women (or maybe in the Alfie case, men) which they will publish unless the person in question comes in to give an interview etc. Tiger Woods was naive enough to go for the interview and boast of his ‘brilliant’ family life. Now, I hate golf with a passion,but I am pretty sure it suffers as a sport without its best player. The details of the Alfie case are still unknown.

Anyway, after narrow defeat to the Aussies in September 2006, he broke down and revealed all to (then) Welsh coach Scott Johnson, who informed the two most senior players in the Welsh side – Martyn Williams and Stephen Jones. He recalls waiting to talk to them for the first time afterwards:

“As I sat in the bar waiting for them, I was terrified, wondering what they were going to say. But they came in, patted me on the back and said: ‘We don’t care. Why didn’t you tell us before?’ (The Sunday Times, December 20).

This was the nightmare from which Alfie could never escape in the pursuit of his dream to be a rugby player – a dream which he knew he could only achieve at the expense of his family, friends, fellow players and himself as a gay man. Although many young Welsh boys would kill to be a Grand Slam-winning Welsh captain, it is impossible to comprehend the mental torture that he must have been through in all of this. He even turned to the church to ask God to ‘rid him’ of what he saw not as his burden of ‘shame’.

That he put up with this intolerable situation for so long shows just what the human spirit can adapt and to what lengths it can go to come to terms with the world’s prejudices. For Thomas, this even meant a loving relationship with a woman who he said he – and this can be believed – “would die for”. It is shocking to think just how many men are currently living (‘living’ seems the wrong word) such lives in order to be ‘normal’. In a country where rugby probably has more of a following than Christianity, let us hope that he serves as an inspiration to many other men enduring such existential anguish.

gtWhether one is the village priest, local barman or captain of the Welsh rugby team, every fetter on the flowering of one’s individuality and personality must be fought tooth and nail. As we have seen in the tragic case of the gifted footballer Justin Fashanu, who took his life after coming out, when it comes to such an infinitely complex matter as concealing and denying one’s own sexuality, these are genuinely matters of life and death. Although my heart also goes out to Alfie’s wife, with whom he has obviously shared a loving relationship, I do not in any way blame him. He knew full well that he could either be gay or a professional rugby player. For someone with his ability, this was no easy choice to make. It is one that nobody should have to make again.
As good a player as he is, Alfie is not going to rid sport, let alone society, of homophobic attitudes and prejudices. LGBT oppression can only be overcome through mass class organisation and a political programme that does not treat such questions as mere trifles to be fought merely in the workplace, but as key democratic questions for society as a whole. Given the left’s narrowness in passing off some sort of generalised and deepened trade union dispute as a ‘strategy’ for working class power, it is hardly surprising that we have such a shoddy record in this field. And those who scorn the notion of a communist political platform for sport should take another look at the best of our history and events like the Workers’ Olympics.
In spite of some rather vomit-inducing reporting in The Times (cue Thomas in the pink Cardiff Blues’ away strip with the heading ‘pink power’ and a huge picture of him getting ‘double-tackled’ by the Kiwi back row) the establishment response, and indeed that of the rugby world more generally, has been positive. Fans have rallied to his defence and hopefully this will mark a sea change in rugby culture. Let us now hope that he can finish off his highly successful career and start to live his life away from media hounding and the paparazzi preying on him on the streets of Cardiff.

What Alfie has done is to open up an argument that Marxists – whatever our opinion of what, in this author’s eyes, is the best sport on the planet – would be stupid to ignore or to play down. You can rest assured that the topic will be heatedly debated in Welsh pubs, rugby clubs and over family dinner tables during the festive season. Just as in the Cardiff Arms Park stands ten years ago, old prejudices and outright reactionary sentiment will surface, but this can only be overcome through democracy, discussion and exposure (like all prejudices, in fact). With the spread of girls’ mini-rugby and mixed-sex ‘tag’ rugby in schools, concerted LGBT campaigning in rugby and sport could bear fruit.

In 2010 we might just see a sporting world where homosexuality is at least less of a taboo, and for this we must thank Alfie.

At least this is something Welsh rugby fans can look forward to…With or without Alfie, my Cardiff Blues are still in the doldrums after being trounced by Toulouse last week. We are a watery image of last year’s successful team. With the prospect of the Blues not making the quarter-finals of the Heineken Cup (think Champions League but with an oval ball), Wales looking flaky ahead of the The Six Nations and an ‘ENGERLAND’ football Summer ahead, this writer’s sporting year ahead does not look great though. C’mon Ivory Coast!

Ben Lewis is a member of the Communist Party of Great Britain (www.cpgb.org.uk) and a regular writer for the ‘Weekly Worker’. He blogs in English and German at ‘Die Welt ist Klein’ (http://benjamin-edgar-klein.blogspot.com)

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Reader Comments

Absolutely superb fucking article mate.
It’s even MORE difficult in football.
Season’s greetings

A

#1 
Written By attila the stockbroker on December 24th, 2009 @ 7:30 pm
DavidR

Still don’t understand rugby – but great and very moving article

#2 
Written By DavidR on December 25th, 2009 @ 9:43 am
DavidR

As I said on my earlier note – I’m not too well informed about rugby (I’m a footie fan myself) but wanted an opinion on whether the much publicised flying tackle by what has been termed “a deranged woman” on a former member of the Nazi youth, currently occupying a leading position in the Catholic church, constituted a fair rugby tackle or not?

Infallible he may be; unfellable clearly not.

#3 
Written By DavidR on December 27th, 2009 @ 11:39 am

Technically brilliant – low hard and with the head to one side as to avoid any damage to her own neck. Clearly, Italy is making more rugby progress than we thought!

Thanks for the comments

Ben

#4 
Written By BenL on December 28th, 2009 @ 11:23 am
Remi Moses

Great article. Earlier this year Donal Og Cusack, the goalkeeper for Cork’s hurling team and one of the most prominent players in GAA in Ireland came out publicly. There has been a generally positive reaction. His biography goes into some detail about his experiences: he told his teammates some years ago and his family, and there was lots of rumours (and some terrace abuse) but most people seem to admire him for it.

#5 
Written By Remi Moses on January 1st, 2010 @ 12:45 pm

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