Middlesex University Shamefully Cuts Philosophy Department

This post was written by Jacob on April 28, 2010
Posted Under: Education,Employment

BREAKING NEWS – PLEASE REPUBLISH!

Earlier this afternoon all staff in the Arts and Education section of Middlesex University received the following email:

 Dear colleagues,

Late on Monday 26 April, the Dean of the School of Arts & Humanities, Ed Esche,
informed staff in Philosophy that the University executive had ‘accepted his
recommendation’ to close all Philosophy programmes: undergraduate, postgraduate and
MPhil/PhD.

Philosophy is the highest research-rated subject in the University. Building on its
grade 5 rating in RAE2001, it was awarded a score of 2.8 on the new RAE scale in
2008, with 65% of its research activity judged ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally
excellent’. It is now widely recognised as one of the most important centres for the
study of modern European philosophy anywhere in the English-speaking world.

The MA programmes in Philosophy at Middlesex have grown in recent years to become
the largest in the UK, with 42 new students admitted in September 2009.

The Dean explained that the decision to terminate recruitment and close the
programmes was ‘simply financial’, and based on the fact that the University
believes that it may be able to generate more revenue if it shifts its resources to
other subjects – from ‘Band D’ to ‘Band C’ students.

As you may know, the University currently expects each academic unit to contribute
55% of its gross income to the central administration. As it stands (by the credit
count method of calculation), Philosophy and Religious Studies contributes 53%,
after the deduction of School admin costs. According to the figures for projected
recruitment from admissions (with Philosophy undergraduate applications up 118% for
2010-11), if programmes had remained open, the contribution from Philosophy and
Religious Studies would have risen to 59% (with Philosophy’s contribution,
considered on its own, at 53%).

In a meeting with Philosophy staff, the Dean acknowledged the excellent research
reputation of Philosophy at Middlesex, but said that it made no ‘measurable’
contribution to the University.

Needless to say, we very much regret this decision to terminate Philosophy, and its
likely consequences for the School and our University and for the teaching of our
subject in the UK.

· Professor Peter Hallward, Programme Leader for the MA programmes in
Philosophy,

· Professor Peter Osborne, Director, Centre for Research in Modern European
Philosophy,

· Dr. Stella Sandford, Director of Programmes, Philosophy

As many readers will know, the philosophy department at Middlesex is one of the most important departments working on continental philosophy in the UK. It has, for a long time, been a centre for people working on critical theory, aesthetics, marxism, psycho-analysis, and radical philosophy. To say that such a department made no measurable contribution to the university is an absolute travesty. The figures speak for themselves, but do not show the great contribution that this department has made to academic life both in London and around the country.

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Reader Comments

Ben D

This is terrible news.

#1 
Written By Ben D on April 28th, 2010 @ 4:07 pm
Richard Bellamy

This is dreadful – how can they call themselves a university if they do not value excellence in research?

#2 
Written By Richard Bellamy on April 28th, 2010 @ 4:45 pm

This is really appalling news. But it’s not a done deal, departments and jobs have been saved in higher education already in the last 12 months, and it can be done again.

#3 
Written By Dan on April 28th, 2010 @ 5:00 pm
Professor Jonathan Gorman

Apart from the appalling academic failure of a university to appreciate such meritorious philosophy, just what kind of outfit is it that requires 55% of the department’s gross income for central administration? A mere 45% kept for teaching and research, the university’s only proper business? Does HEFCE know what is going on there?

#4 
Written By Professor Jonathan Gorman on April 28th, 2010 @ 5:13 pm
Joe

What a terrible decision. From what I’ve seen/heard, the state of many Philosophy departments around the world is dire, but this is shocking. The ubiquity of the profit motive is truly regrettable; Universities should (and do) serve roles other than generating profit.

#5 
Written By Joe on April 28th, 2010 @ 5:18 pm

55% of income for central admin? That is sheer managerial exploitation and power-grabbing.

Dreadful news in any case. University life just doesn’t exist any more in this country. When the powers that be figure out the negative consequences of this trend it will be too late.

#6 
Written By Enzo Rossi on April 28th, 2010 @ 5:25 pm
Matt

Can anyone explain what Band D/Band C students are, and why one is considered better than the other?

#7 
Written By Matt on April 28th, 2010 @ 5:31 pm
Kyle

What is Dean Esche’s ‘measurable’ contribution to the University? And is there a ‘+’ or ‘-’ before that figure?

Yet another instance of a disquieting trend: higher education accommodating itself to the goals, standards, and business models of the corporate world. The Dean thinks universities succeed when they produce profit and future consumers/employees. It used to be that the university’s goal was to produce humanity. What a loss!

First Athens sins against philosophy; now Middlesex administration.

#8 
Written By Kyle on April 28th, 2010 @ 5:35 pm
Johan

this is terrible news. The middlesex philosophy department is a unique and essential voice in the landscape of academic philosophy, especially in a country still so dominated by one particular form of philosophy. A real shame.

#9 
Written By Johan on April 28th, 2010 @ 5:58 pm
Prof John Holmwood

In a recent speech, Lord Mandelson encouraged Universities to concentrate on ‘sustainable excellence’. This decision suggests that true excellence will not itself be sustainable at many British Universities. It is a shameful indictment of the current culture of audit in which Univesities make a performance of their mission to deliver for users, but can no longer maintain the University as a space for critical thought.

#10 
Written By Prof John Holmwood on April 28th, 2010 @ 6:28 pm
Iain MacKenzie

This is a deplorable decision. Philosophy at Middlesex is an oasis of radical, critical, modern European thought in a disciplinary desert of lifeless analysis. This decision must be resisted. What can we do?

#11 
Written By Iain MacKenzie on April 28th, 2010 @ 7:30 pm
Victor Anderson

It would be really useful to have a list of names & addresses for people to write & complain to, not only within Middlesex but also others who might have an influence on the situation.

#12 
Written By Victor Anderson on April 28th, 2010 @ 9:38 pm

The four people to write to are as follows:

Vice-Chancellor of the University, Michael Driscoll, m.driscoll@mdx.ac.uk;

Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research and Enterprise, Waqar Ahmad, w.ahmad@mdx.ac.uk;

Deputy Vice Chancellor Academic, Margaret House, m.house@mdx.ac.uk;

Dean of the School of Arts & Education, Ed Esche, e.esche@mdx.ac.uk.

#13 
Written By Nina Power on April 28th, 2010 @ 10:29 pm
bewildered

This is crazy! The philosophy department put Middlesex on the map. They are cutting their most famous programme? I can’t believe this is happening.

#14 
Written By bewildered on April 28th, 2010 @ 11:04 pm
Chittibabu Padavala

This is sad. I am a great admirer of Professors Peter Hallward and Osborn. Probably, consideration is not just financial. I hope these two giants would move ahead with their philosophy teaching in one way or the other. Probably, by running short-term philosophy courses for activists outside academia or running on-line philosophy courses.
If this decision got anything to do with the radical implications of their philosophy, the establishment’s decision is self-defeating. The great bridge these two philosophers represent – between the philosophies of Continental and English-speaking world- will be more effective if its focus shifts from academia to activist world.

#15 
Written By Chittibabu Padavala on April 29th, 2010 @ 5:37 am
Kiarina Kordela

The coproratization of education is the end of civilization.
PS.It is no news that contemporary “market” methods of discipline and control are more effective than old-style “totalitarian” censorship. What is new is that what used to be the loci of resistance against censorship—the institutions of intellectuals—now become its complicit, if not active leaders.

#16 
Written By Kiarina Kordela on April 29th, 2010 @ 6:24 am
William Outhwaite

A disgraceful decision, suggesting that the management have no awareness of the deserved prestige of Middlesex philosophy worldwide.

#17 
Written By William Outhwaite on April 29th, 2010 @ 6:46 am
Peter Vale, NELSON MANDELA OROFESSOR OF POLITICS, Rhodes University, South Africa

Is this the beginning of the end of Britain’s long tradition of critical thinking and deep scholarship? The work of the Middlesex Department (and the journal, Radical Philosophy), have been are at the fore-front of innovative thinking in a range of disciplinary tributaries. If this is the harbinger of what is to come, universities in the UK (and elsewhere, too) face dark times.

Today, I’m truly disgusted my that my enlightened British ancestry has come to this!

#18 
Written By Peter Vale, NELSON MANDELA OROFESSOR OF POLITICS, Rhodes University, South Africa on April 29th, 2010 @ 11:28 am
Connie

I’m all but speechless only because my out rage prevents me from saying anything that woouldn’t sound like angry garble. You can, however, lay this saud state of affairs at the doorstep of Mandelson and his “so-called” business model plan for UK universities. As disgraceful as this is, I have a feeling this is only the beginning.

#19 
Written By Connie on April 29th, 2010 @ 11:31 am

This is shocking, as well as disgusting. I notice that the Departments seem to contribute more than 50% of their earnings to the administration of the University: This is even more shocking and disgusting. Are full-time administrators necessary to the running of a good university? They do not research, they do not teaching, they would seem to do no service, except to themselves. Just like Goldman Sachs — produces nothing, steals everything. Capitalism at its best!

#20 
Written By Thomas Pepper on April 29th, 2010 @ 12:48 pm

This is shocking, as well as disgusting. I notice that the Departments seem to contribute more than 50% of their earnings to the administration of the University: This is even more shocking and disgusting. Are full-time administrators necessary to the running of a good university? They do not do research, they do not teach, they would seem to do no service, except to themselves. Just like Goldman Sachs — produces nothing, steals everything. Capitalism at its best!

#21 
Written By Thomas Pepper on April 29th, 2010 @ 12:49 pm
The Toast Whisperer

Look on the bright side chaps, it’s one less university department peddling Marxism. I’d call that a result.

#22 
Written By The Toast Whisperer on April 29th, 2010 @ 1:16 pm
Michael

Fewer.

#23 
Written By Michael on April 29th, 2010 @ 2:54 pm
Alex Callinicos

I too am horrified. Obviously the people who run Middlesex have no idea what a university is. We need an international campaign to reverse this barbaric act.

#24 
Written By Alex Callinicos on April 29th, 2010 @ 3:08 pm
Alan McPherson

Middlesex University is sleep walking into a global public relations disaster by the announcement of the imminent closure of Philosophy. The world-wide condemnation of this boneheaded decision, which is surely gathering force, can only be avoided by a volte-face which, judging by the low level of decision making exhibited thus far, seems unlikely. The blind pursuit of the bean counters holy grail of 2% is regrettably entirely understandable in an institution that clearly has no morality, holds nothing dear and is merely beholden to a crass accountancy that is blindly indifferent to wider values. By proposing to close the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy, Middlesex University has transformed itself, as if by magic, into a world centre for excellence in the worship of the bottom line. This short termism leaves Middlesex University standing proud as a beacon of incompetence, indifference, and the second rate. Henceforth Middlesex will have an international reputation as an educational institution unfit to call itself a university.

#25 
Written By Alan McPherson on April 29th, 2010 @ 3:20 pm
Bob Lockie

If the modern British university is to be run as a university – i.e. by academic criteria – then this decision is indefensible. If it is to be run by some other criteria then what are these? By any business criterion the position of the university managers themselves is indefensible – they can’t manage for toffee, they couldn’t live in the world of profit and loss whose surface characteristics they pathetically ape, and they’re running our once-great higher education system into the ground. Please sign the petition at:

http://www.gopetition.com/petitions/save-middlesex-philosophy/sign.html

#26 
Written By Bob Lockie on April 29th, 2010 @ 3:20 pm
V. Gravanis

I will be one more to say that the consideration is not financial. This is only the excuse. We are talking here about the continuation of the more than one thousand year effort to turn the human being into a materialistic animal instead of a spiritual being for better control of them over us. Philosophy of course is the food for the human being’s spiritual and mental evolution.
To proceed in such disgraceful actions so openly and stupidly, (it is not the only incident lately), means that “they” have come to a state of horror. The human spirit cannot be beaten by “their” materialistic, low to the ground methods and ways of being, which “they” are trying to inject into the humans.
I am sure that In spite of everything, there are democratic mechanisms in Britain that must be used to stop such a disgrace. We will all try to help to this direction regardless state or country, if we want to hold a position amongst the thinking human beings!
Deep at heart, “They”, has nothing to do with political parties and ideologies, religion or country. It has only to do with material, translated now days to money and profit. Human Spirit is their horror, because they cannot fight it.

#27 
Written By V. Gravanis on April 29th, 2010 @ 3:38 pm
Lily

Of course the closure of this successful (by any criteria) department is ideological and political—not financial. The same was true of the closure of CCCS in Birmingham some years ago. Whoever took what Mdx has said at face value, about “financial” reasons for this, simply has not been paying attention. Well known for their irrational, (by the standards of modern management), deeply unethical and debased practices, Mdx management are now simply furthering their agenda of transforming the university into a training centre for “business”. Sites of critical, radical thought and work have no place in this “vision” of Mdx management, even if they are “financially successful”. That they can make such a decision in an untransparent and unacccountable way, is testimony to what happens when seemingly unlimited power is concentrated into the hands of the unaccountable few. The idea that anyone, from business or elsewhere, will be interested in the graduates of their university-as-training centre, rather than graduates of a real university, such as those of the highly respected Philosophy department, is gross hubris. Mass, direct action is needed and a restructuring of power and control within the institution.

#28 
Written By Lily on April 29th, 2010 @ 4:21 pm
Rich

Further to the previous posts, I would argue this is both financial and political. This is part of a process of swingeing cuts across the public sector (following the £850bn bailout of the banking sector) that provides managers with the opportunity to reconfigure services in line with neo-liberal priorities. But only if we let them.
We need resistance and direct action if we are to challenge this agenda. I’m a researcher within the NHS. I have just come from a rally and Day of Action to save from closure the A&E Dept at the Whittington hospital, which is opposite one of Middlesex Uni campuses. In fact we have just heard that we have won our campaign to save the Dept as a result of demonstrations and intensive political campaigning. We need the same in higher education: rallies, demonstrations, strikes, occupations. I’d recommend following these links and joining these networks as a good starting point:

http://educationactivistnetwork.wordpress.com/
http://www.ucu.org.uk/index.cfm?articleid=4565

Linking the campaigns and building solidarity across institutions will strengthen our hand.

#29 
Written By Rich on April 29th, 2010 @ 5:27 pm
Alan Haworth

The decision to close philosophy at Middlesex is stupid, offensive, and sneaky.

It is stupid for the obvious reason that philosophy at Middlesex is a centre of excellence. For the greater part of my career, I taught at London Metropolitan University, which is, as it were, Middlesex’s ‘next door neighbour’. We had a great deal of contact with Middlesex, and we benefited enormously from it, – especially at the level of original research. I can therefore confirm that Peter Hallward, Peter Osborne, and Stella Sandford ar quite right to describe the department as ‘widely recognised as one of the most important centres for the study of modern European philosophy anywhere in the English-speaking world’.

I find it impossible to believe that a ‘Russell group’ university would close such a high-grade department. How come the management of a ‘new’ university can be so thick?

The decision is offensive, because it appeals to arbitrarily selected, spurious, short-term financial criteria. It seems to be based on the sort of calculation which would be appropriately conducted by a barrow-boy, seeking to undercut the price of bananas being charged by his mate, – the one running the adjacent barrow. It would be interesting to know how Dean Esche’s ‘contribution’ to the university has been ‘measured’. (Can a numerical value really be attached to this sort of thing?) My feeling is that no satisfactory account of such ‘measurement’ can be given, and that the Dean should be told to go back to selling bananas.

Finally, the decision is sneaky because it has been announced right at the end of the summer term, at the beginning of a period when staff and students will be taking a well-deserved break, and when – as a consequence – there will be few people around to protest. In my experience this is absolutely typical of the way management tend to behave in the new universities. I expect they are hoping that staff and students will return to a ‘fait accompli’.

The snake under the stone waits patiently for it’s moment to strike, – and so do Deans of Arts and Humanities.

#30 
Written By Alan Haworth on April 29th, 2010 @ 7:01 pm

The threatened closure of the Philosophy programme at Middlesex is terrible news.
From afar, it looks like intellectual and institutional suicide given the outstandong work and recognition that the programme has both nationally and internationally. In the area of the human and social sciences, Middlesex is largely recognised precisely because of its outstanding philosophers.
I frankly find the idea of closing the programm very short-sighted, and ultimately pervese: a form of institutional masochism.
I sincerely hope that there is a change of mind.

#31 
Written By Iain Chambers on April 29th, 2010 @ 8:27 pm
Dr Howard Fredrics

Those with the power can exercise it as they damn well please, unfortunately. If staff strike over this, that might be the only thing to pressure the administration to reverse this decision. But the staff will have to be ready and willing to sustain the financial squeeze, and I’m quite sure that UCU will do little or nothing by way of strike pay to support staff in this regard, since they’re totally in bed with management (at least UCU at the national level is).

#32 
Written By Dr Howard Fredrics on May 1st, 2010 @ 2:59 pm
wonder

Boo-hoo, the department of marxist bullshit got shut down, even though it met standards of ‘excellence’ which boil down to being the most unthinking acolytes of bullshit totalitarian ideologies. What will circlejerking fascist rent-seekers do now?

Philosophy is important, but what is still more important is that it does not become part of a university system in such a way that ‘excellence’ means to adhere to fascist rent-seeking ideologies.

#33 
Written By wonder on May 1st, 2010 @ 8:44 pm
julia

And that, M’Lud, is the case for the defence.

#34 
Written By julia on May 2nd, 2010 @ 1:00 pm
Aaron

It looks to me like a shot across the bow of all academics in the humanities. If they took down a truly ailing department, it would hardly be a show of power, would it? I agree that schools should strive towards financial sustainability, but this feels completely different–more like an act of intimidation. The fact that it also employed left-leaning academics is icing on the cake for university administration. I suppose the message intended for us all is “watch what you say and do–you could be next.”

#35 
Written By Aaron on May 3rd, 2010 @ 4:48 pm
Boo!

Just needing to add to my voice to the chorus against this closure. What a sad day it is when ubiquitous managerial-speak like ‘no measurable contribution’ becomes mandate for closure. I hope this decision is overturned.
One more reason why a corporate business model should not be applied to education.

#36 
Written By Boo! on May 5th, 2010 @ 5:14 am
Angel

This university is pathetic anyway. they are about 110th on the times higher education list and are classed as one of the worst universities in the uk. I speak from personal experience as i was a victim verbal abuse, discrimination and threatened by two members of an academic team of teachers in another department. i would ask all students national and international to steer clear of this university.

they are using countries like India and China to recruit students because they get thousands and thousands of pounds from. Once those students have been recruited, then no one really gives a damn about the welfare of the students. All they want is bums on seats and students money. The rest, well the worst university experience in my life.

#37 
Written By Angel on September 21st, 2010 @ 9:10 pm
Angel

You see, Middlesex University Management and your academic staff, you are now getting your just desserts of what you and your staff did to me, a motivated and enthusiastic student, not so long ago. The bullying, intimidation, harrassment by your academic staff and then management covering it all up to make it look like i was the perpetrator!! Ha…the truth will be revealed!!! What goes around comes around!! I’m waiting for the day that this university is closed down altogether. It should not even be given the title university as most of the lecturers have little experience or interest in teaching or motivating and encouraging the students. India, China, Malaysia etc, please do not send your children to this university. I beg you. Because the staff and management can be extremely nasty and throw students out of their seminars because they are not competent in teaching

#38 
Written By Angel on September 22nd, 2010 @ 12:57 pm

Angle wrote:

“You see, Middlesex University Management and your academic staff, you are now getting your just desserts of what you and your staff did to me, a motivated and enthusiastic student, not so long ago. The bullying, intimidation, harrassment by your academic staff and then management covering it all up to make it look like i was the perpetrator!! Ha…the truth will be revealed!!! What goes around comes around!! I’m waiting for the day that this university is closed down altogether. It should not even be given the title university as most of the lecturers have little experience or interest in teaching or motivating and encouraging the students. India, China, Malaysia etc, please do not send your children to this university. I beg you. Because the staff and management can be extremely nasty and throw students out of their seminars because they are not competent in teaching”

This is indeed a sad story you tell Angle, and I can understand that you are angry at the university and the individuals who did this to you. But wishing for the university to close is a bit too much. If it is as bad as you describe, then write a formal complaint.

Universities tend to take things like this serious and will most likely investigate.

Just my 2 cent.

#39 
Written By Casey Miller on March 29th, 2011 @ 11:36 am

Connie said previously:

“I’m all but speechless only because my out rage prevents me from saying anything that woouldn’t sound like angry garble. You can, however, lay this saud state of affairs at the doorstep of Mandelson and his “so-called” business model plan for UK universities. As disgraceful as this is, I have a feeling this is only the beginning.”

While I certainly understand the initial frustrated response to what appears to be some shaking news, I was wondering if your feeling regarding this being only beginning played out the way that you thought it might?

Has there been any update to this situation or further unexpected department cuts driven by economics? Often, our initial reaction can lead to over-reaction. Not claiming that in this case, I just find that it can be helpful to re-evaluate reactions to an event at a later time. Allows for a good chance for reflection…

#40 
Written By Sean Thomas on March 29th, 2011 @ 7:20 pm

“Universities tend to take things like this serious and will most likely investigate.”

While true in most cases, but the amount of petition needed and work sometimes only gives minor moves forward. As can be seen a petition indeed was started after the closure:

http://thethirdestate.net/2010/05/the-prospects-for-middlesex/

You can try but will not always win.

#41 
Written By James Frolm on March 29th, 2011 @ 7:25 pm

Angel – while I’m sure you feel very hard done by, I think it’s a little extreme to feel gratiated by this “purely political” action in closingwhat appears to be a well run and adequately funded dept. Revenge is a dish served cold as they say, but surely your revenge is not directed at the people this will affect the most?
Mike
Webmaster at Eczema treatment guide

#42 
Written By Mike on March 29th, 2011 @ 7:33 pm

“This university is pathetic anyway. they are about 110th on the times higher education list and are classed as one of the worst universities in the uk. I speak from personal experience as i was a victim verbal abuse, discrimination and threatened by two members of an academic team of teachers in another department. i would ask all students national and international to steer clear of this university.”

That’s a pretty serious thing to say but unfortunately abuse from professors happens more often that people are willing to admit. The academic community has so much power and influence that it’s hard to know what to do when you’re confronted with this type of situation.

#43 
Written By Tony on March 31st, 2011 @ 12:17 am

I don’t know why they cut the Philosophy Department with very small issue!! I must say that they must take a closer look on what are the things this department can do to their university.

#44 
Written By Dianne cris Becker on April 6th, 2011 @ 1:57 pm

I just do not get how a university can not support research better than this.

#45 
Written By real estate simi on April 12th, 2011 @ 5:54 am

55% of income for central admin? That is sheer managerial exploitation and power-grabbing.
This is in fact a deplorable decision. Philosophy at Middlesex is an oasis of radical, critical, modern European thought in a disciplinary desert of lifeless analysis.
Same happens here in Germany. Cost cutting on social cost and saving bankers pay rises with state mony!
Just my 3 cents…
Frank Suchmaschinenoptimierung
P.S. Mind if I leave a German plug? I’m the webmaster for (Suchmaschinenoptimierung Bochum ) in lovely Germany – Thanks

#46 
Written By Frank on April 13th, 2011 @ 4:14 pm

In my opinion, students go to a university to learn to think critically. Philosphy is the foundation for critical thinking.

#47 
Written By Neil on April 14th, 2011 @ 5:04 am

Hello,
I also believe this was a mistake on their part to remove the Philosophy department. Hopefully they will fix this or the students will be the ones that will lose from this.

#48 
Written By Ben’s Fireplaces on April 15th, 2011 @ 1:41 pm

55%? That sounds pretty high to me. I know that I’m from the US and that Universities may be run a bit differently here, but slashing a department simply because it doesn’t meet arbitrary guidelines seems to be a shame, but also explains the state of education for many of our younger generation. Especially philosophy, such a great subject to stretch the mind of our youth. But no longer.

#49 
Written By Bethesda Real Estate Agent on May 2nd, 2011 @ 2:34 am

Looks like I am a bit late to the party, but in my view, it is a crying shame anytime a philosophy department gets cut. I understand that they are one of the first departments to get the axe, but having been raised in a family with a mother who had an advanced degree in Philosophy, I feel this broad subject is very close to my heart, and is a great building block for families and societies as a whole, and we will all be worse off for this cut.

Greg Fleischaker
Louisville Homes

#50 

Just ran into this article. It’s kind of baffling why a department that has an increase in admissions and interest get cut.

If you make enough noise, I’m sure that with the student support, administrators, and parents…I’m sure you can make a difference.

#51 
Written By Silverback on May 10th, 2011 @ 12:21 am
Sekundaunda

Cash credit – often confused with the concept of a cash loan. Cash loan is a loan of money that is granted by a bank or other entity credit. Cash credit is usually spent for any purpose. The amounts of loans ranging from a few hundred gold to 100 000 PLN. Repayment of credit could in theory extend to 8 years. However, the loan period is usually a year or 2 years. There are also cash loans even shorter, even up to 3 months after taking the cash loan.
Ranking kont
The amount of cash loan depends on net income and the amount of cash loans already taken. The greater the debt of the borrower, the smaller the chance of a very large loan. Examples of where we are in debt in two different banks for the amount of respectively 10 000 15 000 gold and gold is our chance to take another 20 000 are very small. Although you may receive an amount such as 3 000, respectively. Everything depends on whether the installments repaid on a regular basis and we have a regular source of income.
Kredyt gotowkowy lukas

#52 
Written By Sekundaunda on July 13th, 2011 @ 8:49 pm

Business – a motor mechanism, engine, intended for the sake the deportment of goods, towing trailers, trailers (not a farm-toun tractor) or to tote people (and not a bus) with a acceptable block of across 3500 kg.

Bearer may edge a ourselves with a grouping C (inasmuch as fire trucks GVW from 3.5 to 7.5 tons is sufficient listing C1). In the event of combinations of vehicles (lorry with trailer or semi-trailer) is also required to procure a permit classification E.

There is also a impose precision, which defines the basically of the car for the benefit of the sundries pro companies seeking to deduct VAT on the acquisition price. It defines the “Law on stretch on goods and services”.
Chłodnie
In North America (U.S. and Canada), the wares is a vehicle with a allowable all-out authority surpassing 26,000 pounds, or wide 11700 kg. It can be carried gone after obtaining a empower called the English: Commercial Driver License.

#53 
Written By AutoAnna on August 8th, 2011 @ 9:38 am

What a terrible shame. From what I’ve seen, the state of many Philosophy departments around the world is dire, but this is shocking. The profit motive is truly regrettable; Surely Universities should serve roles other than generating profits?

#54 
Written By Jack Pot on September 14th, 2011 @ 11:25 pm

The Toast Whisperer said, “Look on the bright side chaps, it’s one less university department peddling Marxism. I’d call that a result.”

A result indeed. Of course they could always raise taxes to better fund the program, which would be a lesson in socialism for the students.

#55 
Written By Michael the Chiropractic Marketing Doc on September 22nd, 2011 @ 4:04 pm

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  13. The death of philosophy in the neoliberal world « Universities in Crisis
  14. Universities in Crisis » Blog Archive » The Death of Philosophy in the Neoliberal world
  15. Philosophy Education is Under Threat « Ethical Realism
  16. ‘Creative’ Functionalism and Continental Philosophy at Middlesex « Really Open University

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