Wacky Races Insurrectionism: Some Thoughts On The Climate Camp

This piece is part diary, part analysis, about the Edinburgh Climate Camp, and I’ve *tried* to write it in a way that’s of interest to people with no knowledge of the camp as well as people who went along. If you want to know why we went to Edinburgh, give my pre-camp post a glance. […]

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This week, I have been mainly reading…

…a mixture of lefty blogs and some other stuff that caught my eye. Much like always really: Jim Jepps on why seeing the back of NHS Direct might not be the end of the world. Why is Malcolm X like David Cameron? Read Dave Osler to find out. Also at LibCon, Sunny thinks the Guardian […]

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What’s the problem with doping?

Over the past few weeks and months stories have been surfacing suggesting that Lance Armstrong, seven time-winner of the Tour de France, cancer survivor, Livestrong founder and inspiration to millions, may have taken performance-enhancing drugs at some point during his career. Given that he’s a professional cyclist, this is hardly a surprise, though it will […]

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For heaven’s sake, it’s time lay off cat-bin-woman, and for the animal rights loons get back in their box.

The animal rights movement in this country has a bit of a PR problem. I am sure it has some reasonable, well adjusted individuals within its ranks. Yet it also seems to harbour quite a number of demented window lickers, who come to the fore when incidents like the cat-in-bin scandal occur. I am glad […]

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$15 an article: sweatshop journalism and the cost of the free internet

For a long time we have heard about the dearth of journalistic jobs. Newspapers have struggled to “adapt their business models” to the epoch of everything written being free. Meanwhile other kinds of businesses are arising to pick up the slack, and take on underemployed writers. And some of them offer a truly frightening picture […]

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The “Ground Zero Mosque” debate – it’s not all about rights

The Guardian believes uncompromisingly in freedom of expression, but not in any duty to gratuitously offend…Freedom of expression as it has developed in the democratic west is a value to be cherished, but not abused. Guardian Leader Comment, 4 February 2006, on the Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy. In September 2005, a Danish newspaper published 12 […]

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In defense of benefit frauds

In the last month we’ve all heard about David Cameron’s proposed crackdown on benefit frauds. Lots has been said around the left about how these proposals are completely missing the mark in terms of where the government can be saving money if need be, but there hasn’t been much of a defense of the benefit […]

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The less than Wonderful Election of Oz

Guest post by Roland Miller McCall Australia went to the polls today after the most mundane election campaigns anyone can remember. Neither Labor nor the Coalition opposition has engaged with the big issues nor proposed a vision for Australia’s future. In recent days the debate has descended into high farce with the defining issue of […]

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An olde English celebration of olde English drinking culture

Apologies in advance for a slightly silly friday evening post, but one thing that has got up my (fairly long) nose for some time now is the fairly persistent commentary about how great it would be if we adopted a “continental” drinking culture. For one thing, its part of a broader, longer-standing tendency amongst the […]

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I may be being ironic…

I just heard this broadcast on Radio 4, with the inspirational figure who paid for  it interviewed. It is a work of majestic genius, not of monumental racism. It is a tightly compressed, one minute burst of politics, densely layered and criss-crossed with meaning. It  manages to squeeze an extraordinary amount of subtext out of […]

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